Wednesday, January 7, 2009

Banh Bo (Cow Cakes)



Banh bo is another Vietnamese steamed rice cake. Banh means cake and bo literally means cow. It was said long ago there was a poor Vietnamese man who could not feed his family. One night in his dream, a cow appeared before him and taught him how to create this cake. He then got successful by selling cow cakes. This cakes taste so great when dip in coconut sauce. If you do this right, you will see the honeycombs in the middle of the cake. These cakes have the aroma of the coconut milk and a bit chewy and sweet.




Ingredients:
1
1 bag rice flour (1 lb) (leave out 3 tbsp)
1/2 bag tapioca starch (7 oz)
60 grams fermented yeast (see below instruction)
1 tsp sugar
2 cups warm water (100F-110F)

2
1 1/2 cups sugar
1 cup water
1 can coconut milk (400ml)

1 bag vanilla


Step 1:

Ferment yeast:
***Chinese yeast ball (Ragi) pound to powder form. Use100 gm of cooled cooked rice, 1 tsp sugar, 1/2 tbsp yeast Ragi powder, 1 tbsp water. Mix everything together, cover and let it ferment for 3-4 days before using. After the fermented rice is ready, take only 60 grams out to use in step 2 below.

Step 2:

1. Add 3 tbsp of rice flour to the 60 grams fermented yeast to form a dough. Now pour the warm water into the rice flour and tapioca starch. Stir while pouring the water in. Now add in the yeast dough. Stir well.



Ferment it over night until bubbles formed. (1)


Step 3:

2. Cook sugar into boiling water and stir until dissolved. Let it cool for 2 minutes before pouring into the flour mixture. Stir well and let it ferment again until you see bubbles formed. Add in 1 can coconut milk and let it ferment again for another hour. (2)

The more bubble the more honeycomb. - Put in vanilla at the end when about to steam.



3. Divide the batter into 3 and mix in your color. Or just leave it white.



4. Heat up the water and oil the molds. Steam the molds for 1 minutes or until hot and then pour in the batter. Steam the cake until cooked....10-15 minutes. When about done, sprinkle some roasted sesame seeds on the cakes. Serve with coconut milk sauce.



Coconut Milk Sauce:


Cook 1 can coconut milk with 2-3 tbsp sugar, pinch of salt, and 1 1/2 tbsp corn starch. Remember to stir and not let it bubble up or stick to the pan. Add more sugar if needed. If you like the sauce to be thin then us less corn starch.






82 comments:

Miss. Her said...

Hi. I am looking for a vietnamese steamed rice cake and it looks like you have it here! I love these "cow cake." I've always been wanting to know how to make them. I've google for the recipe but mine never turn out correctly like these on the photo. Mine didn't rise or had any honey comb, even after over night. Perhaps the recipe that I tried they didn't add any tapioca starch? Plus, how come some recipes they add baking powder?

I'd appreciate if you reply back to me. Thanks.

ch3rri said...

Hi Miss Her,

Baking soda will not work. The key to success is the yeast. Get the yeast balls at the asian store. Grind it to powder and follow the recipe. The american yeast will not work and it will give the cake yellowish color. Tapioca starch is for a chewy cake. It taste better when the cake is chewy.

Also, this is the vietnamese version. The chinese one is not chewy.
Hope this helps. Good luck.

Miss. Her said...

Thank you so much!! Now i'm excited and anxious to try it out. =P

ch3rri said...

I like these cakes very much...but take some time since you got to wait for fermentation. Also, you can keep the rest in refrigerator and microwave it and it will taste good again. When steaming, you got to make sure the batter in the mold is at least 1 inch thick. This will give you more bubble.

Miss. Her said...

Yes, I love these cow cake. I race to the asian market(owned by vietnamese)every wednesday just to buy them. Silly but it's the truth. =P

Melissa said...

can you tell me what "one bag of vanilla" is? Is this vanilla extract? How much in measurement is "one bag?" I bought the ready to make bot banh bo and it says the same thing..."one bag of vanilla" but I can't figure out what that is? Thanks.

ch3rri said...

The bag of vanilla is powder type. It is white so it won't add color to the cakes. You don't need it if you don't have it. Good luck.

Anonymous said...

You said use 100 gm of cooled cooked rice + 1 tsp sugar + 1/2 tbsp yeast Ragi + 1 tbsp water and let it ferment for 3 days before using. Do I need to mash the rice? Where should I keep the fermented stuff - in the refrigerator? Doesn't the rice spoil in just one day if left outside?

Anonymous said...

You said use 100 gm of cooled cooked rice + 1 tsp sugar + 1/2 tbsp yeast Ragi + 1 tbsp water and let it ferment for 3 days before using. Do I need to mash the rice? Where should I keep the fermented stuff - in the refrigerator? Doesn't the rice spoil in just one day if left outside?

ch3rri said...

It should not spoil and after 3 days the rice will be softer and you can stir them and it will easily dissolve. I usually leave it for more than 3 then it will be softer and easier to use. Use one of container with lid so you can close it. Place it in room temperature and let it sit there. Mine never get spoil even after 4 days or a week.

If the rice a lone left outside for a day then it will but this have the yeast so it will not.

Later on in the process you will mix part of the fermented rice with some flour and water to form a dough. At that point just use your spoon to mix the dough and the rice will be smashed. You will see what I'm saying when you get to this process.

hope this help.

Anonymous said...

Hi...ur banh bo looks good!! Can u please advise in grams or oz the weight of -
1) 1 bag of rice flour
2) 1/2 bag of tapioca flour??

Thks,
Susanna

ch3rri said...

The rice flour usually is a 1 lb bag. The tapioca starch come in a 14 oz bag. So half of the tapioca is 7 oz.

Good luck. :)

Anonymous said...

Thks for quick reply!!:)

Susanna

Hang said...

I have been searching for this recipe for awhile. Yours is different then the others but your reasons for that make sense so I'm giving yours a try. :) 2 questions though.

1. I have packets of vanilla sugar. Is that the same?

2. Is there a place to buy the yeast ball on-line. I did a search but didn't find anything. Maybe it goes by another name. Otherwise, where is it normally sold near in the asian market.

Thanks!!!!

ch3rri said...

Hi hang,

Yes, use vanilla powder because you don't want the cake to be brown.

As for the yeast ball, i saw them at almost every asian supermarket. Got to the flour, beans section. They're usually on the lower level. They look like white round balls and a lot of time it's in chinese or english. Do a research on yeast ball and see how it look like and it will be easier to find in the store. Good luck.

jade said...

when u say 1 can of coconut milk, how much is that?

by the way your banh bo cakes look really yummy! i haven't made any before but i hope mine will turn out like yours!!

Anonymous said...

i was wondering how much is 1 can of coconut milk? Also, when you say:

'2. Cook sugar into boiling water and stir until dissolved. Let it cool for 2 minutes before pouring into the flour mixture. Stir well and let it ferment again until you see bubbles formed'

how long do you let it ferment after adding the sugar (but before adding the coconut milk?

by the way your banh bo cakes look really nice i wish mine would turn out like yours when i make it :)

.::jade::. said...

Hello ch3rri,

I wasn't sure on your recipe if we have to add 1 tsp sugar or 1 tbsp to the chinese yeast/rice/sugar mixture? bcos it says 1 tbsp in ingredients, but 1 tsp in the instructions.

My rice is fermenting right now, but I accidentally added 1 tbsp of chinese yeast =_= so I decided to add tbsp of sugar ><.
will the dough still work?

thanks for your help

jade

ch3rri said...

Hi Jade,

Sorry for the delay. I was in China and just got back. The instruction and recipe is correct. If you decide to use the chinese yeast then you use 100gm cooked rice, 1 tsp sugar, and 1/2 tbsp chinese yeast powder and some water. Your yeast might turn out but I'm not really sure since the rice ratio is not match up with the other two ingredients. Maybe you should do another one just in case. I usually leave the left over in the fridge and use it again later on.

To avoid confusion I will revise recipe. Good luck. Let me know how yours turn out.

Anonymous said...

Hi, I'm so excited I came across your recipe! Where do you get the molds for your banh bo to get it wavy at around the edges? Can I use aluminum cup cake foils to get the same shape? Also, other vietnames recipes calls for com ruou, but yours does not, just curious how will this effect the taste?

ch3rri said...

Hi. I used the aluminum egg tart mold. The com ruou is the chinese yeast ball with the cooked rice. Have to ferment it for 3 days.

Amy Nguyen said...

Thank you Cherri. Did you oil or spray the mold first? Amy

ch3rri said...

Yes, You will have to oil the molds. Oil the molds and heat it first before pouring the batter in.

Amy Nguyen said...

Hi Cherri,

This is my first time fermenting the Chinese yeast balls. The rice is fermenting for 2 days now and I opened the lid to see what it looks like and there's little hair like substance growing on the rice...is this normal? Did I do it wrong?

ch3rri said...

Hi Amy,

Yes, there should not be little hair like thing in there. When you mix the rice, water, yeast together...make sure the rice is mixed well and that every rice is wet. If you need more water then drop in a little bit more. Give it another try. Make sure the rice is cooled before using.

Anonymous said...

Hello Cherri ,I already have com ruou made but not to ur measurment, so how much do I need? And do u use the julcie as well as the rice? Thankyou:-)

ch3rri said...

Hi. Just use the amount I suggested...60 grams to mix with the flour. Then measure that flour mixture of 80 grms to the rice flour mixture.

Anonymous said...

Sorry Cherri, did you mean used 60 gms of com ruou ( both com ruou jucie and com ruou) to add to your rice and tapioca starch flour measurment. I wasn't sure how much com ruou to used. Thanksyou:-)

ch3rri said...

yes, just mix the juice and the rice together. This way you will get an even mixture. If your com ruou have a lot of juice then use more of the rice. You don't want your cake to have too much wine taste.

Anonymous said...

"Banh Bo" name translation is not "cow" cakes, it should be translate ask crawling cake. I make the mistake of translating it, and my Vietnamese teacher corrected me. :-)

The flower rise so fast when you cook it just like crawling out of the dish.

Thank-you for a great blog.

Minh

Manang said...

These remind me of a favorite type of what we call puto in the Philippines (although we called it puto, it is not the traditional puto; I like these even better than the traditional puto). We used to buy these from Goldilocks. Since I saw this post of yours, I had been looking online for the yeast ball, but was unsuccessful. Maybe I will make a list of ingredients to call owners of Asian stores before I go there.

ch3rri said...

Manang,

The yeast ball should be available at most Chinese or Vietnamese supermarkets.

Rachel said...

hi, how do I grind the chinese yeast balls? Where did you buy the aluminum egg tart mold from? Thanks.

ch3rri said...

You can grind the yeast balls by placing in a ultimate chopper or grinder. If no chopper then you can use a heavy handle to pound the balls into fine powder.

You can get the aluminum molds from bed bath and beyond.

Remember to ferment the rice for at least 3-4 days. If you decide not to use the fermented rice after 5 days then refrigerate it so it can stop becoming sour.

Anonymous said...

hi there,
is Chinese driest balls is the same as chow paeng? i was wondering if these cakes have the sour taste? i like sour kind. thanks!
christy

ch3rri said...

yes, chinese dried yeast ball is the same as chow paeng. This is not the chinese bak tong koh so it doesn't have the sour taste. If you like the sour taste then the bak tong koh is what you're looking for. But then the bak tong koh that I made did not taste sour. I think it have something to do with fermenting the rice. The longer you ferment the rice then the more sour it is.

Anonymous said...

Thanks a lot ch3rri! I'll try and see if i get the sour taste's cake.
christy

Anonymous said...

Hi. I was wondering what is lye water? And what is ENO salt? Some steamed cakes need the ENO salt. I've looked for the ENO salt but can't find it anywhere in the Asian stores. Is there any thing i can substitute to ENO salt? Sorry, for being funny asking you these dump questions but the thing is that, I'm very new for cooking so i hope you wouldn't mind to explain them to me. Thanks so much!
i'm christy.

ch3rri said...

Hi Christy,

The ENO salt is a fruit salt. I could not find it in the Asian supermarkets either. So I didn't use it. The only thing I would use this salt is when we make Fatt Koh. But then I was still successful even without it. I google it and you can buy it from amazon.

As for the lye water you can find this at the Asian markets. I would not use a lot of the lye water for steamed cakes as it makes the cake yellow/brown.

Anonymous said...

Thanks a lot!
christy

TMB said...

THANK YOU so much for sharing this recipe! I tried 2 other recipes for this cake and failed miserably; then I gave it a 3rd shot w/ your instructions and they were delicious and beautiful. I was so happy I took plenty of pictures! (1) http://i97.photobucket.com/albums/l204/puddingmango/20100709BBH4.jpg and (2) http://i97.photobucket.com/albums/l204/puddingmango/20100709BBH7.jpg -- honeycombs galore. Thank you again. -TMB-

Anonymous said...

Hi. Can I buy ferment yeast at the American store or Asian store if I don't want to use the yeast ball? Your instruction for the ferment yeast is that if we choose to use the option of yeast balls or is that what ferment yeast is? I was not clear on that instruction.

Anonymous said...

Hi. Can I buy ferment yeast at the American store or Asian store if I don't want to use the yeast ball? Your instruction for the ferment yeast is that if we choose to use the option of yeast balls or is that what ferment yeast is? I was not clear on that instruction.

ch3rri said...

I only use the yeast balls to make the fermented yeast. I believe you can use the fermented yeast (rice wine dessert) to make these cakes. You can find the rice wine dessert at the Asian store only. But I've never buy it from the Asian store and use that so I don't know if the result will be the same.

Anonymous said...

Hi cherri
So the fermented yeast is powder type mixed with the rice flour. How is that going to turn dough like In your step one?

ch3rri said...

I edited the post so it will be easier to read. The yeast ball is round so you will have to pound it to powder form. Follow step 1 to form the fermented rice. Follow the step by step and you will be successful. Good luck.

Anonymous said...

what did you use to give the pinkish and greenish tint to the cakes. The green looks like a pandan flavoring. How about the pink?

Anonymous said...

what did you use to give the pinkish and greenish tint to the cakes. The green looks like a pandan flavoring. How about the pink?

ch3rri said...

The green is the pandan flavor. I just used food coloring for the pink color.

Mar said...

Hi, I am trying to make this, but I don't know what "1 bag vanilla powder" means. I have a mix for steamed rice cake (bot banh bo) and it says to add 1 bag vanilla powder. Can you please tell me what that means and where I can get it? How much vanilla powder is it? Where do you get a bag of vanilla powder? Can I substitute anything for the vanilla powder if I can't find it? Also, can I use a mixer or do I have to kneed it by hand?
Thanks so much for your beautiful blog!

ch3rri said...

Hi Mar,

There is vanilla in a bottle which is brown so we don't want to use that because it might change the color of the dough. They do sell the powder package at the Asian stores. If you can't find it then it should be ok. If you are making Banh bo then don't need to use mixer.

If you are making banh bao, then you can use a mixer if you don't want to use your hands. Just make sure you don't over knead the dough or it might be too tough or chewy.

thuy said...

Hi,

I just wanted to clarify some points. One bag of rice flour is used in total but 3 tbsp taken from this to form a dough. Also, can you tell me why you have to form a dough, why can't you add the fermented yeast straight??

I am assuming the ingredients mentioned under number '1' relates to Step 2 - I have accounted for all the ingredients in step 2 but the '1 tbsp sugar'. Where in the process should I add the 1 tbsp sugar in step 2?


Thankyou for your help,
Thuy

ch3rri said...

You have to form the dough so the fermented rice soften. You don't want the whole rice in your cakes.

Regarding the 1 tsp sugar, it's for the fermenting rice.

Hope this is helpful.

thuy said...

So the '1 tsp' listed under ingredients number 1 is an additional amount when you combine the rice, topioca flour and water together?

Also, said to leave on overnight - but how long for? 24 hours? How do I know when it's right to use it?

Thankyou,
Thuy

ch3rri said...

That tsp of sugar is for the fermenting rice. Leaving overnight until bubbles formed. Sometime it could be less than 24 hrs. I usually mix the ingredients in the afternoon or evening. Then check on it the following afternoon or evening. If I see lots of bubbles then it's good for step 3.

thuy said...

Thankyou for your response. I have another question, in step 3, you said to let it cool for 2 minutes before pouring into the flour mixture - once you combine them together you said to let it ferment until bubbles formed. How long will this take?

Thanks,
Thuy

ch3rri said...

When you boil the sugar it will be too hot which can kill the yeast. So let it cool down for at least 2 minutes then pour in the mixture.

You will have to leave so it can form bubbles again. It will take a couple of hours. Just check on it every few hours.

Then you add in the coconut milk. Now you will have to leave it for another hour so it can form bubbles again.

SO, the main thing about this cake is the waiting time. Got to have patience or there will be no honeycombs in the cakes.

thuy said...

I made it - the texture was like what you would expect of Banh bo with honeycombs galore BUT it was a bit sour and not so sweet.

I made a few errors. I added 1 tsp sugar to the 1 lb rice flour, 7oz topioca starch, 60g fermented yeast, 2 cups of water because I thought that it was what your recipe implied but like you indicated it was just for the fermenting rice.

In step 3, after pouring the hot sugar and water mixture into the flour, I let it ferment overnight. I kept checking it for bubbles but after awhile I gave up and let it ferment overnight.

After adding the coconut milk, I waited for one hour like your recipe said but I couldn't see any bubbles so I let it ferment for 6 hours in total and then stem it.

I threw the whole batch away as I don't think you can save it.

Please let me know on how I can improve.

Thankyou,
Thuy

ch3rri said...

Hi Thuy,

Sorry it didn't work out for you. If the patch came out sour then it's the fermenting. It might be that you overferment the rice or the rice flour mixture.

1.) Ferment the rice for 3-4 days and the rice should somewhat dissolve. It should still taste sweet. If taste sour then your cakes will take sour too.

2. When you have to ferment it overnight, it should be between 12-24 hrs ...which rarely go to 24 hrs. At this stage you will see bubbles and the mixture seems light and foamy.

3. Even if you add that tsp of sugar it should not affect the taste of the cakes as that tsp will not make a difference.

4. After adding in the warm/hot sugar syrup to the mixture, you need to stir well and then let it rest for max a couple hours. It should not take overnight to see bubbles because the mixture was feremented overnight in step 2 so bubble should easily form.

5. After addin in the coconut milk, stir well and let it res for another hour or two...but not 6 hrs as too much fermenting will leave your cakes sour. You will see bubbles but they will be smaller so sometime it's hard to tell. Sometime the mixture will be foamy like texture.

You can always take a small amount to test steam if you want to see the mixture is ready or not and if the cakes have honeycomb after steaming or not.
To steam, you should gently restir the mixture then steam.

thuy said...

Thankyou for all the tips.....will be a long time before I can try it out again.

Pauline said...

Dear Ch3rri,
Loved reading your blog and learned a lot.
For those who wants to buy ENO, you can find it at INDIAN MARKET, they use it for their steamed rice buns.
Regards
Pauline H.

ch3rri said...

Thanks Pauline. I'll see if there is any Indian Market around here.

Anonymous said...

Hi ch3rri,
I'm a big fan of your cow cakes. It is the best cow cakes I've ever tasted. Last year I made them a few times, and they came out really good. But the last couple weeks I tried making them again, and it has never came out correctly. I have tried it four times already. I do not know why the mixture never has become bubbly the next morning. Even after the sugar the the milk added into the mixture, I never see bubbles. I'm so frustraed. I have no idea what I did wrong. Please give me some tips and advise. Thanks. :)

ch3rri said...

It could be the yeast. Did you leave the yeast for 3-4 days? Is this old yeast? Make sure the yeast is not expired.

The mixture should be form bubbles before adding the coconut milk. This process take a day, 24 hrs for bubbles. Then add the sugar water and let the mixture form bubbles again. Might take half or another day. Then add in coconut milk and let it form bubbles again.

Anonymous said...

Hi Cherri,
Thank you for those tips and responding so quickly! The yeast balls I had, were bought last year. Is it possible that the yeast is unable to be used? The mixture looks quite dry the next morning, with absolutely no bubbles. THe mixture was covered the whole time I let it ferment. Is that the problem?
Thank you.

ch3rri said...

the mixture should not be dry. I used old yeast before and still works. did you ferment the rice and yeast correctly? Make sure the rice fermented...sometime might have to leave it 4 or 5 days. Just make sure it's fermented before use. I also cover my mixture when fermenting and that is not a problem.

If you see that the rice and yeast not fermented then you might have to change the yeast. Good luck

Anonymous said...

Hi Ch3rri,

I was wondering how much 60 grams of the com ruou is in terms of cups/tablespoons for those of us without scales. Also, I am still confused as to what the 60 grams com ruor should be comprised of...so just scoop up 60 grams of stirred up com ruou for 50/50 mix of rice and juice? Thank you so much! I love your blog!

ch3rri said...

60 grams of com ruou is about 1/3 cup. When the com ruou is fermented, the rice should turn soft and there will be a little liquid in it. Just mix it up and scoop out 1/3 cup to use.

Anonymous said...

Chinese yeast ball, there are two of them in a small bag. Do I use two of them or just one?

ch3rri said...

just use one yeast ball and grind to powder. follow the recipe for fermented yeast.

Zoe said...

Cherri,
I have a few questions regarding your recipe:

-Step 1: DONE
Ferment yeast: I am done with this process and took only 60 grams out to use in step 2 below.

Step 2: At this stage, the mixture is quite dry right? So i wonder how bubbles going to form?

Thanks,
Zoe (TrucVy)

ch3rri said...

Zoe,

The mixture at this stage should be paste like. It will form bubbles and the mixture will look a little lighter and fluffy the next day.

Anonymous said...

Hi! Do you have to steam the mixture exactly one hour after putting in the coconut milk or can u wait a longer time period? Also, can u save the mixture so you don't have to steam it all at one? If so, is there a specific way to store the remaining mixture?

Anonymous said...

Oh my. I finished steaming everything and it doesn't smell right. It smells like very old coconut oil. The chewiness is there but everyone who tried it cannot get over the taste and smell of super old coconut oil. Since I live in the northwest, my house stays at about 66-71 degrees F so I fermented com ruou for 4-5 days and taste fine... Just plain. With the yeast dough, flour and starch mixture, I let that ferment a little less than 24 hours. After putting in the sugar and water mixture, I let it ferment 2 hrs. After putting in coconut milk (whole can of savoy brand) , I let it ferment for about 5-6 hrs. Please help me; I want to make a delicious edible banh bo.

ch3rri said...

Hi. I think you ferment the mixture too long after mixing in the coconut milk. Over ferment will leave a yeasty smell/taste to the dough. I've made this in the winter time too and ferment time is just about the same. Maybe just 1-2 hours over or until I see some bubbles. 5-6 hours over ferment is a long time. Also, if you do not want to steam everything the same day, I think putting in the refrigerator might help since the cold temperature will stop the fermentation. But I usually just steam everything on the same day. If I can't finish the cakes then I'll save it for tomorrow and all you need to do is resteam or microwave to get the soft texture, still the same great taste.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for your quick reply! I will try this again with your advice. I tasted my com ruou mixture everyday since putting it in the fridge, the yeast,beer like taste gets stronger each day. Did I make the com ruou wrong or should I just buy the com ruou dessert in the cups from deli? (I am sure they use cooked sweet rice and not the regular rice)

Thank you Cherri! Ur awesome!

Anonymous said...

Hi... I just got done steaming the cake. Mine also taste sour... & that old coconut flavor & smell... um... not so good. What did I do wrong? Practically did everything as directions specified. I even ran back home during my son's band concert to add n the coconut milk after letting the mixture sit for about an hour after adding the warm sugar & water mixture. Please help!

Anonymous said...

I was wondering if this recipe can be made WITHOUT coconut milk. Because the coconut milk gave it a very bad sour taste & smell. Or maybe the sugar water mixture should have been a lot cooler then waiting just 2 minutes after turning off the stove on it as the direction specified. The heat from the hot sugar water mixture probably made the coconut milk sour... spoiled it.

Anonymous said...

This cake does not look as white as the steamed rice cakes I've seen & had before. Why is that??? It's slightly grayish. Although, I'd have to admit... there r lots of honeycomb effects & very soft. I could eat this cake all by myself... only if it didn't taste sour & like spoiled coconut milk.

Anonymous said...

I was wondering if this recipe can be made WITHOUT coconut milk. Because the coconut milk gave it a very bad sour taste & smell. Or maybe the sugar water mixture should have been a lot cooler then waiting just 2 minutes after turning off the stove on it as the direction specified. The heat from the hot sugar water mixture probably made the coconut milk sour... spoiled it.

Kristy said...

Hi. Sorry to hear your cakes didn't turn out good. Did you try the fermented yeast before adding into the rice flour? It's very important if the taste of the fermented yeast is sweet or strong wine taste. I always make sure the taste of the fermented yeast is not too strong or it can affect the taste of the cakes.

Every time I make these cakes I follow the exact same recipe and they always turn out good. I think the only time it didn't is when my fermented yeast tasted too strong and not sweet. So I taste my fermented yeast every time making sure it's sweet with only some wine taste. Sometime the temperature can affect the yeast too. So maybe let the sugar water cool for 3 mins or so before adding. Also do not ferment for too long after adding in the coconut milk as long fermenting will result in a sour and yeasty taste. Hope this helps. I will make this again soon as I'm hungry for some banh bo just looking at the pic. :)

Kristy said...

This is the vietnamese banh bo and usually make it with coconut milk. I don't think the hot sugar water will affect the coconut milk since you'll have to wait at least 1 hour or until you see bubbles before adding in coconut milk. The hot sugar water might kill or over ferment the yeast in the flour mixture leaving a sour yeasty smell. Next time taste the fermented yeast making sure it's sweet and not too much wine flavor. I still have fermented yeast in my refrigerator 6 months ago and still taste sweet. I'll use this next time to make the banh bo again.